Why should I update my web browser?

I am posting this information here because I have had a few comments from people saying there having a problem with some of the graphics not loading properly. The reason could most likely be because they are using an older version of their browser. As technology evolves old software will not function properly as it doesn’t know how to handle it.

An example is when Microsoft came out with Windows 10 many older versions of software would no longer be supported, thus you had to upgrade them in order for them to work.

Apple did the same thing when they upgraded their version of IOS. If you didn’t do the installation puff you couldn’t install the lates versions of software. In a matter of fact older Apple computers couldn’t even be upgraded to the newer version of IOS.

This post is just not just about Why should I update my web browser it also gives some valuable information as to why you should keep all your software up to date.

Update your browser to get the most out of the internet

More than ever, websites are taking advantages of all the new features that modern web browsers provide; HTML5 video and audio, advanced JavaScript and CSS styling all rely on you having a modern web browser. If you don’t use the latest version of your web browser, you’re probably missing out on some of the latest features.

Many websites (including very big ones like Gmail, YouTube and Facebook) have stopped supporting older versions of browsers. If you’re running something that’s very out of date, you probably won’t be able to use some or all of the features of these sites.

Stay safe and secure

If you run a web browser that is out of date and which contains security vulnerabilities, you risk having your computer compromised by criminals. Depending on the security exploit, your personal information (including emails, banking details, online sales, photos and other sensitive information) could be stolen or destroyed. This is not a hypothetical occurrence; it happens regularly and in large volumes.

If your computer’s security is compromised you also run the risk of being used as a “middle man” in online crime; or as an unwitting pawn in large scale attacks against other internet users or companies. So even if your personal data is not stolen, if compromised, your computer can be turned into a “zombie”; sending out thousands of spam emails per day, or be forced to participate in “denial of service” attacks against other websites; all without you even being aware.

How to update your browser

Follow your browser/device vendor’s instructions

Make sure that you keep your web browser patched and up to date by following your vendor’s instructions. If your operating system no longer supports modern browsers, it’s time to update that too! Anti Virus software is a necessity these days as well.

Follow our guides

Check out our guides to update your web browser for detailed information to make sure you’re up to date.

In an ideal world, every one would only run modern web browsers. It would not only make the users themselves safer and give them fuller and more enjoyable experiences; but it would make Web Developers and System Administrator’s lives much easier and enjoyable, as well as saving clients and companies lots of money as they no longer have to support out dated software.

Keep auto-update enabled

Some web browsers (such as Chrome and Firefox) have an “Auto-update” feature enabled by default. Browsers such as Safari and Internet Explorer include updates in the latest versions of their respective Operating Systems.

Tell everyone

As a responsible entity on the internet, WhatIsMyBrowser.com encourages everyone to keep their web browser up to date.

You can help by encouraging your friends and family to keep their web browsers up to date as well. If you run a website, consider putting a link in your website’s footer to WhatIsMyBrowser.com reminding your users to stay up to date.

Laptop buying guide

8 essential tips to know before you buy a Laptop.

Laptops are compact enough to carry with you, yet versatile enough to run demanding applications. Notebooks are the best tool for doing serious work or play whether you’re at home, on the road or in a college classroom. For those reasons, we’ve compiled lists of the best business laptops and best college laptops, not to mention our best laptops rankings for most users. 

While standalone tablets and smartphones are always popular, most people realize that everything from typing a research paper to crunching videos to gaming works better on a laptop. So what type of laptop should you get? We put together a laptop buying guide to help you out.

There’s a wide variety of sizes, features and prices, which makes choosing the best laptop a challenge. That’s why you need to figure out what your needs are. 

After reading this post checkout the Laptops offered on my Website

Quick Tips

These are the most important things to consider when choosing a new laptop. For a lot more detail, see the sections below.

  • 12.5 to 14-inch screens offer the best balance between usability and portability. Larger screens are fine if you don’t travel much and smaller models are great for kids.
  • If you’re spending over $600, shoot for these minimum specs: Core i5 or Ryzen 5 CPU 1920 x 1080 screen 8GB of RAM and SSD Storage instead of a hard drive.
  • 9+ hours of battery life is ideal if you plan to take your laptop anywhere at all.
  • Consider a 2-in-1 laptop (either a bendback or detachable) if you want to use your laptop as a tablet. If not, a standard clamshell notebook may be a better choice.
  • Chromebook’s are good for kids and students and their functionality is expanding rapidly. Windows 10 laptops and MacBooks both offer plenty of functionality; which platform you prefer is a matter of personal taste.

1. Pick a platform: Windows 10 vs. Mac vs. Chrome OS?

This is not an easy question to answer, especially if you’re not familiar with both Macs and PCs. But this quick overview of each platform’s strengths and weaknesses should help.

Most laptops come with one of three operating systems: Windows, Chrome OS or MacOS (for MacBooks only). Choosing the right one is a personal preference, but here’s a quick summary of what each offers.

Windows 10

The most flexible operating system, Windows 10, runs on more laptop models than Chrome OS or MacOS. Windows notebooks range in price from under $150 to several thousand dollars and offer a wide array of features from touch screens to fingerprint readers to dual graphics chips. Windows 10, the latest version of Microsoft’s flagship operating system, provides a number of improvements over Windows 7 and 8, including the ability to switch between tablet and desktop modes, a revamped Start menu with Live Tiles and the Cortana digital assistant. 

Since its launch in July 2015, Windows 10 has also added a host of improvements, including the ability to use follow-up questions with Cortana, search your email using natural language and use your stylus to scribble almost anywhere. Windows 10 laptops are great for students, researchers and business users, and they’re the only machines gamers should consider. 

Apple macOS

All MacBooks come with Apple’s latest desktop operating system, macOS Big Sur. Overall, the operating system offers similar functionality to Windows 10, but with a different take on the interface that substitutes an apps dock at the bottom of the screen for Microsoft’s Start menu and taskbar. Instead of the Cortana digital assistant, Mac users get Siri. They can also perform transactions with Apple Pay, take calls or texts from their phones and unlock their laptops with an Apple Watch. 

However, macOS isn’t made for touch, because no MacBook comes with a touch screen. The latest macOS Big Sur operating system brings iPad apps over to Mac (and iPad and iPadOS apps can run natively on M1 Macs), as well as huge improvements to both the Safari browser and Siri. 

Chrome OS

Found on inexpensive Chromebooks such as the Samsung Chromebook 3. Google’s OS is simple and secure, but more limited than Windows or macOS. The user interface looks a lot like Windows with an application menu, a desktop and the ability to drag windows around, but the main app you use is the Chrome browser. The downside is that many of the “web apps” you use don’t work particularly well offline. However, that’s changing as all new Chromebooks, including the high-end, Google PixelBook, can now run Android apps.

If you need a device to surf the Web and check email, navigate social networks and chat online, Chromebooks are highly portable and tend to offer good battery life at low prices. They are also extremely popular with schools and parents because they are hard for kids to infect with malware and more functional than most tablets. If you need a Chromebook, look for one with at least 4GB of RAM and 16GB of storage. A 1920 x 1080 resolution preferred and 4K is better but very uncommon. Pay extra to get a 2-in-1 if you plan to use Android apps.

2. Decide If You Want a 2-in-1

Many PC laptops fall into the category of 2-in-1 laptops, hybrid devices that can switch between traditional clamshell mode, tablet mode and other positions in between such as tent or stand modes. 2-in-1s generally come in two different styles: detachables with screens that come off the keyboard entirely and flexible laptops with hinges that bend back 360 degrees to change modes. 

Most of these systems are much better at serving one purpose than the other, with bend-backs being laptops first and detachables offering a superior tablet experience. However, if you don’t see the need to use your notebook as a slate, you’ll usually get more performance for your money with a traditional clamshell laptop.

3. Choose the Right Size

Before you look at specs or pricing, you need to figure out just how portable you need your laptop to be. Laptops are usually categorized by their display sizes:

  • 11 to 12 inches: The thinnest and lightest systems around have 11- to 12-inch screens and typically weigh 2.5 to 3.5 pounds.
  • 13 to 14 inches: Provides the best balance of portability and usability, particularly if you get a laptop that weighs under 4 pounds.
  • 15 to 16 inches: The most popular size, 15-inch laptops usually weigh 4 to 5.5 pounds. Consider this size if you want a larger screen and you’re not planning to carry your notebook around often. Laptops with 16-inch displays are rare but Apple might get the trend started with its 16-inch MacBook Pro.
  • 17 to 18 inches: If your laptop stays on your desk all day every day, a 17- or 18-inch system could provide you with the kind of processing power you need to play high-end games or do workstation-level productivity.

4. Check that Keyboard and Touchpad

The most impressive specs in the world don’t mean diddly if the laptop you’re shopping for doesn’t have good ergonomics. If you plan to do a lot of work on your computer, make sure the keyboard offers solid tactile feedback, plenty of key travel (the distance the key goes down when pressed, usually 1 to 2mm) and enough space between the keys. If you’re buying a Windows laptop, be sure it has Precision touchpad drivers. 

Look for an accurate touchpad that doesn’t give you a jumpy cursor and responds consistently to multitouch gestures such as pinch-to-zoom. If you’re buying a business laptop, consider getting one with a pointing stick (aka nub) between the G and H keys so you can navigate around the desktop without lifting your fingers off the keyboard’s home row.

5. Pick Your Specs

Notebook components such as processor, hard drive, RAM and graphics chip can confuse even notebook aficionados, so don’t feel bad if spec sheets look like alphabet soup to you.

CPU: The “brains” of your computer, the processor has a huge influence on performance, but depending on what you want to do, even the least-expensive model may be good enough. Here’s a rundown:

  • Intel 11th Gen CPUs: Intel introduced 1th Gen Tiger Lake processors that will power the next generation of laptops. You can read about these processors in more detail here.  To summarize, Tiger Lake — a 10-nanometer chip — offers improved integrated Iris Xe graphics with up to 4.8Ghz speeds as well as Thunderbolt 4 support. The new EVO brand sets parameters for top laptops, including a minimum of 9 hours of battery life.
  • Intel Core i9: Supplanting the Core i7 as the top-of-the-line CPU from Intel, Core i9 processors provide faster performance than any other mobile chip. Available only on premium laptops, workstations and high-end gaming rigs, Core i9 CPUs are only worth their premium price if you’re a power user who uses the most demanding programs and apps. 
  • Intel Core i7: A step up from Core i5, models with numbers that end in HQ or K use higher wattage and have four cores, allowing for even faster gaming and productivity. There are also Core i7 Y series chips that have lower power and performance. Keep an eye out for CPUs that have a 10 in the model number because they are part of Intel’s latest, 10th and 11th Gen Generation Core Series, and offer better performance. 
  • Intel Core i5: If you’re looking for a mainstream laptop with the best combination of price and performance, get one with an Intel Core i5 CPU. Models that end in U are the most common. Those with a Y in the name are low power and have worse performance while models with an HQ use more wattage and appear in thicker gaming and workstation systems. Intel’s newest 11th Generation Tiger Lake CPUs have four cores, and a number of useful features, including Wi-Fi 6 support, Thunderbolt 4 integration and better AI. 
  • Intel Core i3: Performance is just a step below Core i5 and so is the price. If you can possibly step up to a Core i5, we recommend it.
  • Intel Xeon: Extremely powerful and expensive processors for large mobile workstations. If you do professional-grade engineering, 3D modeling or video editing, you might want a Xeon, but you won’t get good battery life or a light laptop. 
  • Intel Pentium / Celeron: Common in sub $400 laptops, these chips offer the slowest performance, but can do if your main tasks are web surfing and light document editing. If you can pay more to get a Core i3 or i5, you’d be better off.
  • Intel Core m / Core i5 / i7 “Y Series:” Low-power and low heat allow systems with these processors to go fanless. Performance is better than Celeron, but a notch below regular Core U series.
  • AMD Ryzen 4000 and Ryzen 5000: A new set of chips that are designed to compete with Intel Core i5 and Core i7. We’ve found Ryzen 4000 and Ryzen 5000chips to outperform equivalent Intel Core processors. For example, the Ryzen 5 4500U CPU delivers about the same performance as an Intel Core i7 CPU. Not only do you get great performance and endurance but Ryzen 4000 and Ryzen 5000-equipped laptops tend to be cheaper than their Intel counterparts.
  • AMD A, FX or E Series: Found on low-cost laptops, AMD’s processors — the company calls them APUs rather than CPUs —  provide decent performance for the money that’s good enough for web surfing, media viewing and productivity.
  • Apple M1: The first of Apple’s custom silicon, the ARM-based M1 chip crushes the competition when it comes to raw performance and endurance. Found on the MacBook Air and MacBook Pro 

MORE: Which Laptop CPU is Right for You?

RAM: Some sub-$250 laptops come with only 4GB of RAM, but ideally you want at least 8GB on even a budget system and 16GB if you can spend just a little more. For most folks, 32GB or more is more than enough while 64GB and above is reserved for power users.

Storage Drive (SSD): Even more important than the speed of your CPU is the performance of your storage drive. If you can afford it and don’t need a ton of internal storage, get a laptop with a solid state drive (SSD) rather than a hard drive, because you’ll see at least three times the speed and a much faster laptop overall.

Among SSDs, the newer PCIe x4 (aka NVME) units offer triple the speed of traditional SATA drives. Sub-$250 laptops use eMMC memory, which is technically solid-state but not faster than a mechanical hard drive.

Display: The more pixels you have, the more content you can fit on-screen, and the sharper it will look. Sadly, some budget laptops still have 1366 x 768 displays and so do a few business laptops, but if you can afford it, we recommend paying extra for a panel that runs at 1920 x 1080, also known as Full HD or 1080p. Higher-end laptops have screens that are 2560 x 1600, 3200 x 1800 or even 3840 x 2160 (4K), which all look sharp but consume more power, lowering your battery life. 

Display quality is about much more than resolution. IPS panels range in color and brightness, so read our reviews to find out if the laptop your considering has a good display. We typically look for an sRGB color rating of over 100% and brightness great than 300 nits results. If you want the very best picture quality and don’t care about battery life, consider an OLED display. You should also keep an eye out for upcoming display technology to hit laptops, including miniLED. 

Touch Screen: If you’re buying a regular clamshell laptop, rather than a 2-in-1, you won’t get much benefit from a touch screen and you will get 1 to 2 hours less battery life. On 2-in-1s, touch screens come standard. If you still want a touch screen, check out our best touch screen laptops page.

Graphics Chip: If you’re not playing PC games, creating 3D objects or doing high-res video editing, an integrated graphics chip (one that shares system memory) will be fine, especially Intel’s latest Iris Xe graphics. If you have any of the above needs, though, a discrete graphics processor from Nvidia or AMD is essential. 

As with CPUs, there are both high- and low-end graphics chips. Low-end gaming or workstation systems today usually have Nvidia MX450 or GTX 1660 GPUs while mid-range models have RTX 2050 or RTX 2060 and high-end models have 30-series chips like the RTX 3070 or 3080 GPUs. Nvidia maintains a list of its graphics chips from low to high end.

Nvidia’s rivals, AMD, is Apple’s vendor of choice for graphics cards, although you really shouldn’t buy a MacBook for gaming. AMD launched the Radeon RX 5600M and the Radeon RX 5700M GPUs last year. AMD also keeps a list of its graphics cards. 

Ports: While the absence of ports is usually not a deal-breaker when choosing a laptop, it’s helpful to get the connections you need right on the system, rather than having to carry a slew of dongles. Most mainstream laptops will have USB 3.0 ports and HDMI out for video. However, an increasing number of laptops use USB Type-C or Thunderbolt 3 and Thunderbolt 4 ports that are USB Type-C compatible. 

Getting Type-C is a definite plus because you can use it to connect to universal chargers and docks. If you can wait, USB 4 will arrive soon with faster transfer rates and the ability to daisy-chain 4K monitors with one cable. Other useful connections include SD card slots, headphone jacks and Ethernet ports (especially if you’re a gamer).

Connectivity: If you need to use your laptop on the go, consider buying a notebook with 4G LTE or 5G support. You’ll have to pay for a data subscription plan, but this will allow you to access the internet away from a router. If you want a laptop with the latest and greatest connectivity options, find one with Wi-Fi 6 support. Wi-Fi 6 offers increased theoretical throughputs and a more stable connection than 802.11ac. 

We also suggest looking for a laptop with Bluetooth 5, the latest standard that offers improved connectivity with Bluetooth-enabled devices, like mice and headphones.

DVD/Blu-ray Drives: Few laptops come with optical drives, because all software and movies are downloadable, though we’ve kept track of the laptops with DVD drives. However, if you really need to read/write discs and your laptop of choice doesn’t come with a built-in DVD drive, you can always buy an external one that connects via USB for under $20.

6. Don’t Skimp on Battery Life

If you’re buying a large, bulky notebook or a gaming rig that you’ll use only on a desk near an outlet, you don’t have to worry about battery life. However, if you plan to use the laptop on your lap, even if it’s at home and or work, you’ll want at least 7 hours of endurance, with 8+ hours being ideal. To determine a notebook’s expected battery life, don’t take the manufacturer’s word for it. Instead, read third-party results from objective sources, such as our reviews.

7. Plan Based on Your Budget

These days, you can buy a usable laptop for under $200, but if you can budget more, you’ll get a system with better build quality, stronger performance and a better display. Here’s what you can get for each price range.

  • $150 to $250: The least-expensive notebooks are either Chromebooks, which run Google’s browser-centric OS, or low-end Windows systems with minimal storage and slower processors, such as the HP Stream 11 and the Dell Inspiron 11 3000. Use these as secondary computers only or give them to the kids.
  • $350 to $600: For well under $600, you can get a notebook with an Intel Core i5 or AMD A8 CPU, 4 to 8GB of RAM, and a 500GB hard drive, all respectable specs. However, at this price, most notebooks don’t have an SSD, a full-HD display or long battery life. There are a few notable exceptions, such as the Acer Aspire E 15 and Asus Chromebook Flip C434. 
  • $600 to $900: As you get above $600, you’ll start to see more premium designs, such as metal finishes. Manufacturers also start to add in other features as you climb the price ladder, including higher-resolution displays and SSDs. The Lenovo IdeaPad 530s and Asus ZenBook UX333FA are great examples of laptops that offer all these perks for less. 
  • Above $900: At this price range, expect notebooks that are more portable, more powerful or both. Expect higher-resolution screens, faster processors and possibly discrete graphics. The lightest, longest-lasting ultraportables, like the Apple MacBook Air and the Dell XPS 13, tend to cost more than $1,000 (although you can get the Dell for less if you don’t opt for a touch screen). High-end gaming systems and mobile workstations usually cost upward of $1,500 or even as much as $2,500 or $3,000.

8.Mind the Brand

Your laptop is only as good as the company that stands behind it. Accurate and timely technical support is paramount, which is why Laptop Mag evaluates every major brand in our annual Tech Support Showdown. This past year Apple came in first place, followed by the big story of the year: Razer, while Dell rounded out the top three. 

Support is only part of what makes a notebook brand worth your money. You also have to consider how the manufacturer stacks up to the competition in terms of design, value and selection, review performance and other criteria. In our 2020 Best and Worst Laptop Brands report, HP placed first, followed by Asus and Dell. We’ve also rated gaming laptop brands, with MSI taking first place and Acer and Alienware rounding out the top three.

Tips and tricks for your voice assistants

It’s not you: How to get Alexa, Siri and Google Assistant to understand you better.

Voice assistants changed the way we interact with technology. Why set an alarm manually when Alexa can do it for you? Siri can type up your emails. That’s all well and good — until the third time in a row, your AI assistant is confused and you’re frustrated. 

If you’ve been having a hard time getting through to your voice assistant, here’s how to get Alexa, Siri, and Google Assistant to understand you better. 

1. Watch your tone 

You’ve probably seen viral videos of people screaming at Alexa or Google Assistant when they don’t get through the first time. While it’s tempting to let out your frustration that way, yelling at any voice assistant makes it even less likely to understand you. 

For optimal results, talk at a normal volume. Speak to Alexa, Google or Siri like you’re talking to a friend. 

2. Don’t block the mic 

You ask Siri a question, and you don’t get an answer. Surprise, your thumb is blocking the mic. If your voice assistant can’t hear you, make sure you’re not the problem. 

With Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa, you need proper clearance. Amazon suggests at least eight inches of space around your Echo device. That isn’t always possible, but a little breathing room helps it pick up your words more accurately. 

3. Act natural 

Are you one of those people who talk to a voice assistant robotically? I get it. You think since you’re talking to a robot, you should sound like one too. But today’s AI is designed to pick up on regular human speech. 

Talk like a normal person, and your voice assistant will respond best. Instead of “Alexa, alarm 7!” say, “Alexa, set an alarm for 7 in the morning.” 

4. Create profiles for various family members 

You can train Amazon’s Alexa to recognize up to six different people. This tip can be handy if you have family members with foreign accents or children at varying levels of language development. It’s an easy process and you can let Alexa slowly adjust to various voices. 

Here’s how to set up Alexa profiles: 

  • Open the Alexa app.
  • Tap More Settings.
  • Select Your Profile.
  • Next to Voice, select Create.
  • Select Continue.

You can also train Siri to recognize your voice. Take this extra step if you have an accent or speak quickly. You likely did this when you set up your phone, but try again if you and Siri aren’t getting along.  

  • Open Settings on your iPhone.
  • Click on Siri & Search.
  • Toggle the switch next to Listen for “Hey Siri” off and back on.
  • Complete the on-screen setup process to train Siri to recognize your voice.

You can also teach Siri how to pronounce the names of people in your life, so you call the right person. If Siri says a name wrong, say, “You pronounced it wrong” to set the smart assistant straight. 

Google Assistant has a similar feature called Voice Match. You can teach Google Assistant how to recognize your commands more accurately. 

  • Open the Google Home app.
  • Tap your profile picture or initials.
  • Head to Assistant settings > Voice Match.
  • Click Add Devices.
  • Follow the on-screen directions.

Get even more from Google Assistant with these 5 helpful tricks. 

5. Make your smart assistant smarter 

Often, Alexa, Google Assistant, or Siri will ask for clarification about something you said. This can be annoying, but answering will help train the AI to know you better. 

When you respond to clarify what you were asking about in the first place, it shows your smart assistant how to do better in the future. Every clarification you make, your AI technology remembers and adapts to, making it less likely for you to have to repeat yourself next time. 

There are, however, some questions and settings that might be worth the annoyance. Tap or click for fixes to 5 irritating Echo settings

This article is from Kim Komando.

Lock down your phone from snoops and hackers

NOTE: I found this very informative artical on how to lock down your phone from snoopers and hackers. So I posted the article here to pass this good information around.

Yes it’s Copyrighted so I hope I don’t get in trouble by posting it here.

Copyright 2021, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Your phone is full of secrets, whether you think about it that way or not. Would you want just anyone to see your private conversations, swipe through your photos, or open up your emails? Of course not.

There are digital spies to worry about, too. Tap or click for a way to see which apps are accessing your camera or microphone

In just a few minutes, you can set up your phone the secure way.

1. Do the 2 step

If you don’t have two-factor authentication enabled yet, get on it. This adds another layer of security to your logins by requiring more than just your password. These codes almost always come via text or email, though you can get 2FA codes through an app instead. Tap or click for steps to set up Google Authenticator.

Here’s how to enable this security must-have on your phone:

2FA for iPhone (Apple ID)

  • Go to Settings > [your name] > Password & Security and tap Turn on Two-Factor Authentication.
  • Tap Continue, then enter the phone number where you want to receive the verification codes.
  • Tap Next and enter the code.

2FA for Android (Google)

  • Open your Google Account and select Security.
  • Select 2-Step Verification (under Signing in to Google) and then Get started.
  • Now pick a method for verification: Google prompts, security keys, Google Authenticator or similar apps, or a verification code sent to your phone via text or call.

2. Verification is necessary but make it easier on yourself

Two-factor authentication is a good security measure, but some people don’t activate it because they don’t want to deal with the extra steps involved. Autofill options make it easier to use 2FA when logging into a new device or account.

When you log into a new app or site with your 2FA-enabled iPhone, you no longer have to open the Messages app to get the code. Instead, the code will appear on your keyboard and you can tap it to autofill the security field. 

This feature is built into iOS 12 and later and there’s no need to enable it. Handy! Tap or click here for more iPhone security tips.

For Android, open Settings and search Autofill. Tap the service you want to enable it. Now open Settings again and go to Google Verification Code Autofill and set the slider to On. When using an app that supports it, tap Autofill to populate the security field.

3. Get notified if hackers have your passwords

How do you know if a password is good or if it’s been compromised? If you’re relying on one you’ve used for years, there’s an excellent chance it’s floating around in a data dump. Tap or click here to do a quick check for your email and passwords in recent breaches.

Your phone has some built-in helpers, too.

On an iPhone, Safari stores your passwords in Keychain, accessible from your iOS device or iCloud. Your passwords are checked against a list of breached passwords, informing you if you have been compromised. Good news: This is turned on by default with iOS 14.

Go to Safari Preferences Passwords and look under Security Recommendations to see if any of your passwords were compromised. If so, you’ll get a prompt to update your password with a stronger one.

Chrome’s Password Checkup feature is built into the Password Manager. You may use this on your Android. To check for passwords that have been compromised or are weak, go to passwords.google.com. Select Password Checkup > Check Passwords.

4. Set up a stronger backup

Hopefully, you regularly back up your phone. Ideally, you’ll never need to use your backups, but it’s nice to know they are there if you lose your phone or it won’t turn on.

Encrypted iPhone backups contain information you won’t find in routine backups, including saved passwords, health data, Wi-Fi settings, call history, and website history.

  • On Mac with macOS Catalina 10.15 or later, open Finder. Open iTunes if you’re using a Mac with macOS Mojave 10.14 or earlier or a PC.
  • Connect your iPhone to the computer and locate it.
  • Under the General or Summary tab, find Backups. Select Encrypt local backup.
  • Create a strong password. Save this in a password manager if you use one.
  • Confirm your password. This new backup will overwrite and encrypt your previous backups.

Good news, Android users. If you’re running Android 9 Pie or later, encryption is turned on by default. You can turn it off in settings, but there’s really no reason to do so.

5. Hide your risqué and sensitive photos

We all have photos we don’t want just anyone seeing. Yes, I know what comes to mind — but what about snaps that show financial information, your ID cards or sensitive business details? You can hide these from your main gallery.

Be aware that anyone with enough tech smarts will know to look for hidden folders. It will take them some time to get to your hidden photos, though.

On an iPhone:

  • Open Photos and select the photo or video you want to hide.
  • Tap the Share button then Hide to move them to the hidden folder. You can find the hidden folder under Utilities in the Photos app.
  • Hide the Hidden folder by opening Settings Photos. Scroll down and toggle off Hidden Album. Now it won’t show up under Utilities. Tap or click here for more hidden iPhone features.

On Android:

  • Open Google Photos on your phone and tap to select the images you want to hide.
  • Tap the three-dot menu in the upper-right corner, then tap Move to Archive. This moves your photos out of the main album.
  • To access the archive, tap Library then Archive.

Android has a handy feature called Guest Mode, too, that you can use to limit access to your info. When it is enabled, your contacts, messages, photos and notifications are hidden from view. Tap or click here for directions on setting it up before you need it.

ARE YOUR PHOTOS A MESS?

Do you have more photos than you know what to do with? Check out my podcast “Kim Komando Explains” on Apple, Google Podcasts, or your favorite podcast player.

In one episode, I dive into the best ways to get rid of all the junk and duplicates — like memes and screenshots — hiding the important pictures you want to keep. Plus, how to backup and store your collection for easy browsing and long-term storage.

Tap or click here now to listen to my podcast “Too many photos? Insider tricks to organizing, sorting and storing for the long-term.”

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch The Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television, or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.