Internet Explore is Obsolete

Admin Note: WordPress is the backbone used to create many of todays Websites, Including this Website, so if you’re viewing this website using Internet Explorer it will NOT display correctly. Instead use Apple Safari, Google Chrome or Microsoft Edge browsers. This website is built using WordPress.

Microsoft is dropping support for IE 

Microsoft is taking another big step toward getting rid of Internet Explorer next year, but not every Windows variant still will be IE-free by 2022.

We’ve known seemingly forever that Microsoft someday intended to get rid of Internet Explorer. But it wasn’t until today, May 19, that we got an actual date. IE will be removed from many, but not all, versions of Windows 10 on June 15, 2022

The June 15, 2022 date for retirement of the IE11 desktop application is for most versions of Windows 10, but not all. The retirement does not affect “in-market” Windows 10 Long Term Servicing Channel (LTSC) or Server Internet Explorer 11 desktop apps, Microsoft officials said. It also doesn’t affect the MSHTML (“Trident”) rendering engine. 

The replacement for IE on Windows 10, obviously, is the new Microsoft Chromium-based Edge. Edge has Internet Explorer (IE) Mode, designed to provide compatibility for legacy IE-based sites and apps.

Here’s the fine print as to which versions of Windows are affected by this announcement: IE 11 will be retired for Windows 10 client SKUs (version 20H2 and later) and Windows 10 IoT (version 20H2 and later). Products not affected by this retirement include IE Mode in Edge; IE 11 desktop on Windows 8.1, Windows 7 (with Extended Security Updates), Windows 10 Server Semi-Annual Channel (all versions), Windows 10 IoT LTSC (all versions; Windows 10 Server LTSC (all versions) and Windows 10 client LTSC (all versions). 

Microsoft’s Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page on this says IE Mode will be supported on Windows Client, Server and IoT releases through at least 2029. Microsoft will give one year of notice before retiring the IE Mode experience, officials said.

Last year, Microsoft provided some guidance, but no definitive date, for IE11’s retirement. At that time, officials said that after November 30, 2020, Microsoft Teams would no longer support IE11. And  August 17, 2021, is the date when Microsoft 365, all up, no longer will support IE11.

After March 9, 2021, Microsoft no longer provided any security updates for the legacy Edge desktop app, officials said. They are calling this the “end of life” date for legacy Edge.

WordPress Drops Support of Internet Explorer

The following information comes from WordPressress.org

Internet Explorer 11 (IE11) was released over 7 years ago and is currently used by less than 1% of all users on the Internet with usage rapidly declining. A large majority of popular websites have already stopped supporting IE11 (including Microsoft Teams in 2020), and even the Microsoft 365 apps and services will be dropping support later this year.

When WordPress 5.8 is released in July of this year, Internet Explorer 11 will no longer be supported.

If you are currently using IE11, it is strongly recommended that you switch to a more modern browser, such as Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Safari, or Microsoft Edge. IE11 users have been shown a warning that IE11 is considered outdated in the WordPress dashboard for the last 17+ months.

If you are already using one of the more modern browsers above, you will only be positively impacted by this change, as there are performance benefits to dropping IE11 support. However, if any other users of your site are still using IE11, it’s possible they will be affected.

What does “dropping support” mean?

When support for a browser is removed from WordPress, new features are no longer tested on those browsers and are not guaranteed to function optimally.

Automated tools that generate parts of the WordPress Core source code are also updated to exclude unsupported browsers. This means that any feature relying on these generated files will likely have bugs or stop working for users of those browsers.

The block editor will be the area of WordPress most heavily impacted by this change because almost all of the files related to the block editor are compiled using these automated tools. Other areas of the WordPress dashboard also use CSS built with these tools and their appearance will potentially be impacted when using IE11.

All other areas of the code base that are IE11 specific will need to be identified, evaluated, and removed on a case-by-case basis as the rest are manually maintained. This process will begin in the WordPress 5.9 release, and will likely happen gradually over several major releases. Additionally, any bugs which are reported for IE11 will not be fixed.

How will this affect themes?

No changes will be made to any of the default bundled themes as a result of this plan. No code related to IE11 support (or any other browser that may have been supported when each theme was released) will be removed from default themes. However, any new features added going forward will not be tested in IE11.

If you are not using a default theme, it’s still unlikely that your theme will be affected by this change. Themes typically have their own browser support policies, and changes in WordPress Core do not affect those. It’s possible that your theme author may have removed support for IE11 already.

If IE11 support is important to you and you are unsure whether your theme supports IE11, it is recommended that you reach out to your theme’s developer to confirm.

More information on this change can be found on the Making WordPress Core blog.

How to stop junk text messages and spam for good

BY KIM KOMANDO, KOMANDO.COM

Think about just how many times a day your phone, computer, tablet, watch and other gadgets buzz or ding. It gets annoying and distracting.

Much of that is likely because you haven’t taken the time to clean up your notifications settings. It’s easier than you think with this quick tech fix. While you’re adjusting settings, I bet you’ll find apps you haven’t used in ages. Tap or click for 5 apps you should delete right now.

Then it’s time to tackle the actual junk. If you’ve ever sighed at the sight of spam texts and emails, you’ll love this. Here’s a secret to throwing spammers off your trail.

Think about just how many times a day your phone, computer, tablet, watch and other gadgets buzz or ding. It gets annoying and distracting.

Much of that is likely because you haven’t taken the time to clean up your notifications settings. It’s easier than you think with this quick tech fix. While you’re adjusting settings, I bet you’ll find apps you haven’t used in ages. Tap or click for 5 apps you should delete right now.

Then it’s time to tackle the actual junk. If you’ve ever sighed at the sight of spam texts and emails, you’ll love this. Here’s a secret to throwing spammers off your trail.

Instead, take these steps:

  • For an email: Mark as spam, then hit delete.
  • For a text: Block the phone number and mark the message as spam. Then hit the delete button.

You can also forward spam texts to 7726 (that spells “SPAM”). You’ll get back a message from your carrier asking you to reply with the phone number that sent the offending text. It only takes a minute and can help put a stop to some spam campaigns.

If you have an iPhone:

  • Find the spam message. Press down on it until a menu pops up.
  • Press More in the lower right. Then, tap on the arrow icon.
  • Now you’ll see a forwarded message. Tap on the To: field. Then, enter 7726 and send the message.

If you use an Android phone:

  • Hold down on the spam message.
  • Hit the forward arrow.
  • Send the message to 7726.

Want to be a superhero?

Go beyond the call of duty and contact the FTC and file a formal complaint. While this step requires more time and effort, it’s an excellent way to fight against spammers. Consider it your good deed for the day.

MORE HELP: 6 more clever ways to put a stop to spam texts 

Give your inbox a little help

Spam certainly isn’t limited to calls and texts. Take a look at your inbox. In September 2020, spam accounted for over 47% of all emails sent across the globe, according to Statista.

Most email services do a decent job of detecting spam messages, but you can help the sorting process by confirming or denying automatic spam detection. When you get a spam message that wasn’t labeled as such, don’t just delete it. Hit the “report spam” button to train the algorithm to recognize these malicious messages better.

You can even do the opposite if you find innocuous emails in the spam folder. Label it as “not spam.” 

3 more quick tips for cutting down on email spam

If your inbox is bloated, do something about it. Consider these tactics:

  1. Create two email addresses. Use one for personal use and the other for things like shopping, newsletters, surveys and coupons. If you don’t want a separate inbox, try using aliases or create a burner email for one-time use.
  2. Never display your email address on public sites. Scammers trawl social networking sites, forums, and blogs for emails. If you do want to post your email address somewhere, write it out, so it’s hard for a bot to pick up, like “name at domain dot com.”
  3. Use an original email address. Did you know spammers try to create probable name combinations? Folks with common names are even bigger targets. Try to make a unique address that spammers won’t think up, even if that means adding an extra letter or other characters.

Bottom line: Don’t interact with spammers. When you respond, that’s a green light for them to keep chugging towards you. For your peace of mind, get off the tracks.